Confidence Report 2

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What Do The Following Tables Mean?

The tables in this report show the results of our water-quality analyses for January 1 to December 31, 2022.  Every regulated contaminant that we detected in the water, even in the most minute traces, is listed here. The table contains the name of each substance, the highest level allowed by regulation (MCL), the ideal goals for public health, the amount detected, the usual sources of such contamination, footnotes explaining our findings, and a key to units of measurement.  The State allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old. Although we ran many tests, only the listed substances were found.  They are all below the MCL required.

 

We are pleased to report that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. 

 

The following abbreviations and definitions are important:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant that is allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Minimum Residual Disinfectant Level (MinRDL):  The minimum level of residual disinfectant required at the entry point of the distribution system.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

 

Key To Contaminant Lists:
NTU = Nephelometric Turbidity Units (a measure of water clarity) N/A  = Not Applicable
ppb = parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (µg/l) ppm = part per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)
ppq = parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter   ppt = parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter
WTP = Water Treatment Plant

 

 

2023 Test Results

Chemical Contaminants  
Contaminant Date Tested Unit MCL MCLG Detected
Level
Range
Major Sources Violation
Inorganic
Barium
(Neville Island WTP)
1/24/2023
ppm 2 2 0.028

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

NO
Barium
(Baden WTP)
1/24/2023
ppm 2 2 0.025

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

NO
Fluoride1 
(Neville Island WTP)
1/24/2023 ppm 2 2 0.425
Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive for dental health; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories NO
Fluoride1
(Baden WTP)
1/24/2023 ppm 2 2 0.445
Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive for dental health; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories NO
Nitrate 
(Neville Island WTP)
1/24/2023 ppm 10 10 0.759
Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits NO
Nitrate 
(Baden WTP)
1/24/2023 ppm 10 10 0.910  –
Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits NO
Nitrite 
(Neville Island WTP)
1/24/2023 ppm 1 1 <0.100
Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits NO
Nitrite 
(Baden WTP)
1/24/2023
ppm 1 1 <0.100
Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits NO

1 EPA’s MCL for fluoride is 4 ppm.  However, Pennsylvania has set a lower MCL to better protect human health.

 

 

Turbidity
Contaminant Date Tested Unit MCL MCLG Highest
Detect
Lowest
Percentage
Date Major Sources Violation
Turbidity
(Neville Island WTP)
2023 NTU TT2 0 0.303 100% 12/2023 Soil Runoff NO
Turbidity
(Baden WTP)
2023 NTU TT2 0 0.079 100% 9/2023 Soil Runoff NO

TT = 1 NTU for a single measurement and TT = 95% of monthly samples <0.3 NTU

 

Total Organic Carbon (TOC)
Contaminant Date Tested Unit % Removal Required % Removal Achieved # of Quarters out of Compliance Major Sources Violation
Total Organic Carbon (Neville Island WTP)
2023 % Removed 25 – 35% 57 – 61% 0 Naturally present in the environment NO
Total Organic Carbon (Baden WTP)
2023 % Removed 25 – 35% 44 – 58% 0 Naturally present in the environment NO

 

Lead and Copper
Inorganics Date Tested Unit AL MCLG 90thPercentile
Value
Sites Above AL Major Sources Violation
Lead June 2022 ppm 15 0 4.3 0 of 53
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits NO
Copper June 2022 ppm 1.3 1.3 0.19 0 of 53
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits NO

 

Disinfection Byproducts Date Tested Unit MCL MCLG Highest
Running Average
Range Major Sources Violation
TTHMs [Total Trihalomethanes] Year 2023 ppb 80 N/A 63.5 1 – 73
By-product of drinking water chlorination NO
HAAs [Total Haloacetic Acids] Year 2023 ppb 60 N/A 18.2 1 – 20
By-product of drinking water chlorination NO

 

Entry Point Disinfectant Residual
Disinfectants Date Tested Unit MinRDL Lowest
Detect
Range
Major Sources Violation
Total Chlorine
(Entry Point at Neville Island WTP)
Year 2023 ppm 0.2 1.46 1.46 – 2.13
Water additive used to control microbes NO
Total Chlorine
(Entry Point at Baden WTP)
Year 2023 ppm 0.2 1.36 1.36 – 2.08 Water additive used to control microbes NO

 

Distribution Disinfectant Residual
Disinfectants Date Tested Unit MRDL Highest Monthly Average
Range
Major Sources Violation
Total Chlorine
(Neville Island WTP)
Year 2023 ppm 4 1.87 1.32 – 1.87 Water additive used to control microbes NO
Total Chlorine
(Baden WTP)
Year 2023 ppm 4 1.75 1.15 – 1.75 Water additive used to control microbes NO

 

 

 

 

Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UMCR):

Unregulated contaminants are those for which the EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted. In addition to testing we are required to perform, our water system voluntarily tests for hundreds of additional substances and microscopic organisms to make certain our water is safe and of high quality. If you are interested in a more detailed report or have any questions about the West View Water Authority and our water quality, contact Scott McNicol at (412) 931-3292.

 

 

Unregulated Contaminant Date Tested  Unit
Detection Limit  Average   Range  Major Sources
Violation
Bromide
Year 2019
ppm
1
0.72
0 – 2.3
Naturally-occurring element; used in hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas from shale. NO
Manganese 8/6/2018 ppb 0.4 1.62 1.62 Naturally-occurring element; used in steel production, fertilizer, batteries, and fireworks. NO
HAA6BR Year 2018 ppb N/A 11.0 4.1 – 24.3 By-product of drinking water chlorination. NO
HAA9 Year 2018 ppb N/A 21.8 12.0 – 42.0 By-product of drinking water chlorination. NO

 

Additional Testing:

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs):  No VOCs were detected during the 2022 reporting year at either WTP.

 

Synthetic Organic Compounds (SOCs):  No SOCs were detected during the 2022 reporting year at either WTP.

 

Radiological Analysis:  Radiological Analysis was conducted during the 2020 reporting year at both WTPs, resulting in non-detects for all parameters.

 

We are pleased to report that our water system complied with all drinking water standards in 2023.

 

 


Download – 2023 Consumer Confidence Report